25 Signs You are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo Quilters are the best “advertisers,” but Monkey and I try to help.

Telling your friends about Inklingo is one of many signs that you are an Inklingo quilter (or Inklingoist, or Inklinguist).

You can see how you score below.

 

Inklingo Demo Handout

NEW DEMO HANDOUT

I have prepared a new demo handout in response to requests from quilters who have fallen in love with Inklingo and want to tell their friends about it.

 

Teaching Inklingo

WHY IS MY LOCAL SHOP STILL TEACHING ENGLISH PAPER PIECING?

Good question.

It’s sad, but they probably don’t know about Inklingo yet—and/or they don’t know how they can make more money by introducing quilters to Inklingo.

  • English Paper Piecing has been around for hundreds of years.
  • Inklingo has been around for seven years. One employee. And a Monkey.

If your local shop is teaching English Paper Piecing, you can gently tell them there is a better way. Save your friends from the frustration and disappointment of another UFO.

Be gentle. Be understanding. After all, EPP sounds great in theory. In practice it is slow and the results are disappointing if the stitches show on the front or the intersections don’t meet properly.

Inklingo is a shop owner’s dream come true, but it is a shop owner’s nightmare if a quilter hears about Inklingo somewhere else after buying all the stuff for English Paper Piecing.

 

InklingoPromoJuly201302

BEST DEMO TIPS

My best tips for an Inklingo demo are under the Support tab on the website.

It’s not about computers. It’s about quilting.

NEW WEDNESDAY TUTES – DOUBLE WEDDING RING

We’ve done 8 Wednesday Tutes (tutorials) on Pieced Hexagons so far. (Summary)

We are temporarily changing gears to focus on Double Wedding Ring quilts. (DWR for short.)

 

VIDEO 50 Double Wedding Ring Quilts

Isn’t it nice to know that no matter how complex-looking the design, it is easier and faster to sew when you print the shapes on fabric with Inklingo!

 

Inklingo Print Checklist

25 SIGNS YOU ARE AN INKLINGO QUILTER

  1. You have a strong urge to help quilters who are English Paper Piecing, so you’ve already printed the new Demo Handout.
  2. The first thing you notice about a new magazine or book is whether the quilts are “inklingoable” and you have a stack of Monkey’s Cheat Sheets ready to go.
  3. You are disappointed when a pattern doesn’t tell you the finished size of the triangles.
  4. You are on the lookout for ways to recycle acrylic templates and weird rulers. (Coasters? Mobiles? Tea trays?)
  5. All of your shopping lists are written on hexagon-shaped paper. (Waste not, want not.)
  6. Double Wedding Ring, Alabama Beauty and Clamshell Pickle don’t look too complicated. You have confidence that you can start and finish any design.
  7. You always look at both sides of dark fabric in the shop to be sure you choose one that is lighter on the wrong side, so ultra-fine Inklingo lines will show. (Top Ten Tutes)
  8. The techies at your local Staples know which printers have software for printing Custom Page Sizes because you asked. (Be careful with Hewlett Packard!)
  9. Your family thinks you have an odd relationship with a Monkey.
    (Why is there a print checklist with the picture of a Monkey taped to the front of the Inkjet?)
  10. ALL of your projects are portable but you sew some of the seams by machine.
  11. You expect all PDFs to have “bookmarks” and be easy to navigate, even with 1,000 pages.
  12. You usually use a rotary cutter to cut several layers at a time, but it’s portable, so you can cut the rest of the shapes with scissors while you wait for your daughter’s ballet lesson to finish.
  13. You don’t feel your quilt tops look best on the back of a galloping horse.
  14. Rossini’s William Tell Overture makes you think of an Inklingo movie (80 seconds), not The Lone Ranger movie (2 hr 29 min).
  15. You have icons on your desktop for fast access to the Smart Shopper’s Idea Book and the Index of Shapes.
  16. You have printed fabric scraps as small as 3 x 5.
  17. You have ironed scraps of freezer paper together to make bigger sheets. In fact, you have become a Freezer Paper Aficionado and sometimes use the same sheet 25 times or more.
  18. Shapes with curves, odd angles, or 1.32 inch sides don’t scare you.
  19. All of your pieces are perfect even though you don’t measure when you cut.
  20. You searched the archives on the All About Inklingo blog for “elevator.
  21. You subscribed to the blog (top of right sidebar).
  22. You got all of the answers to the trick questions in the Inklingo Quiz.
  23. You spend more time sewing and less time preparing to sew than ever before.
  24. You have already thought of someone you are going to tell about the new DWR tutes.
  25. You have “liked” Inklingo on Facebook and written at least one review for the website.

Long list, eh?

Inklingo in an elevator.

How do you score? What would you add?

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  7 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

Inklingo Quiz – Just for Fun!

18 Replies to “25 Signs You are an Inklingo Quilter”

  1. Hi Fran, Do you mean the Asian fabric with the flowers? It is very pretty, isn’t it? I just have a little piece left with the selvage. It says http://www.qhtextiles.com HH2011-14. I hope you can find it or something similar. Hugs, Linda & Monkey in Canada

  2. I think you really are an Inklingo Quilter…
    When you can’t even remember the old ways, and are starting to think that just ironing fabric to precut freezer paper is a lot of prep work…;-)

    If you are afraid that Linda will stop designing new Shape collections, even though you will never be able to use all of those that you already own.

    If you are convinced you will never make another quilt if you’ll live to see the day that inkjet printers have become obsolete.

  3. Hahaha. Number 16 is happening here today. I only need to print a 2.5 inch square of circles but the smallest size I can print with my printer is 3 x 5 inches. The extra circles will not go to waste however, otherwise I would have just cut my fabric smaller.

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