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Inklingo Star - Morse Star

“Morse Star” variation of Inklingo Star 9 inch with 8 “fussy printed” kites.

There are step by step illustrations for deciding how much fabric you need for No Waste Fussy Cutting in Part 1 of this tutorial.

Part 2 adds a few more ideas and suggestions.

 

A choice of 4 diamond layouts in the free shape collection.

1. OTHER INKLINGO LAYOUTS

There is often a choice of layouts for a shape. Consider the different Suggested Custom Page Sizes for each of them. One custom size may fit the repeat in the fabric better than others.

For example, there are 4 diamond layouts in the free Diamond Triangle Square shape collection. I used Layout A in the example in Part 1. Layout D is perfect for stripes.

 

Hexagons to print on fabric for POTC

There are 3 hexagon layouts for Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses and each has different Suggested Custom Page Sizes, so you can make the best use of the repeat in the fabric.

NOTE: The third layout was added in May 2014. Everyone who has the PDF can download the newest version just by logging into their account. Details here. Anyone who has ordered/downloaded since May automatically has the expanded version.

The original quilt uses 1 inch 90° Hexagons. There are 3 other sizes available (Main Lucy Boston Page) and they all have 3 layouts for hexagons too. Cool, eh?

 

Fabric with a 24 inch repeat.

2. OTHER REPEATS

12 inches seems to be a common repeat, so that is what I used in the example in Part 1.

The fabric above has a 24 inch repeat. In the example in Part 1, I would buy 6.5 yards and would not have to consider the 4 options. (I’ll let you discover how I figured that out by yourself.)

For an 18 inch repeat (not as common), I might use different Custom Page Sizes, there could be more waste, and you might have to consider the Options 1 – 4 described in Part 1.

 

Inklingo 6-pointed Kaleidoscope Stars

3. OTHER SHAPES

This method works exactly the same way for other shapes like hexagons, 60° diamonds, star points, etc., but you may need sets of 4 or 6 identical shapes/sheets of fabric.

For example, if we were making 6-pointed stars (above), we would need 6 identical diamonds for each star instead of 8.

 

Inklingo Castle Wall with bonus shapes

Inklingo Castle Wall 9 inch includes the bonus triangle, so the center octagon can be 8 triangles with a kaleidoscope effect. Print 8 identical sheets.

This is not the only fussy cutting opportunity with Castle Wall blocks! You can also jazz up Castle Wall by cutting 4 or 8 identical diamonds or 4 or 8 identical squares. The possibilities are endless!

See more of Cathy’s spectacular Castle Wall blocks on the Main Castle Wall Page.

 

Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC)

POTC is a special case. I like to plan on printing 8 identical hexagons (8 identical sheets). Some blocks only use 4 identical hexagons, but some use 12.

Relax! It all works out.

 

Inklingo Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC)

4. CARRY FREEZER PAPER WITH YOU

In addition to printing the Suggested Custom Page Sizes from the shape collection to take to the quilt shop, consider taking sheets of FP cut to the sizes you expect to use. In the example in Part 1, I would take a sheet 7.75 x 11.5 and a sheet 6.25 x 11.5. They can be a good visual aid.

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Stars

5. BUY ONE EXTRA REPEAT?

Some quilters like to be extra-cautious and allow an extra repeat, just in case of a misprint or jam.

In the example in Part 1, an extra repeat means we would use 12 x 9 instead of 12 x 8.  (Arithmetic: 12 x 9 = 108 inches divided by 36 = 3 yards).  Allow 3.25 yards for a staggered start.

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Stars

6. STAND BACK

Consider how you want to feature the fussy cutting. Do you like the “mushy” look when these Inklingo Kaleidoscope Stars are set with gold hexagons or do you think each star should be given more room to shine?

Viewing the blocks from a distance or in a photograph may help you decide.

 

Print shapes on fabric with Inklingo

Whether you fussy cut the shapes or not, it is easier to cut and sew when you have the lines printed on the fabric with Inklingo!

 

Inklingo Kaleidoscope Star from the back

There are detailed instructions for printing, cutting, sewing and pressing diamonds, hexagons, Castle Wall, POTC, and other designs in the archives and the blog is searchable.

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Please subscribe (top of right sidebar), so you don’t miss what is coming next! If you follow Inkingo on Facebook you might even get a sneak peek.

Thank you for visiting.

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  8 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

You do NOT have to have a Facebook account to see what I post on the Inklingo Facebook page.
If you do have a FB account, please like my page and choose “Get Notifications” or Facebook will make me pay to show you what I post.
Facebook only shows my photos to about 16% of the quilters who have liked the page unless I agree to pay.

Thank you for subscribing to the blog!

Fussy Cutting with Inklingo

If you have been following the blog, you know that there are two methods of fussy cutting with Inklingo.

  1. Traditional Templates (Making “Swiss cheese” of the fabric.)
  2. No Waste Fussy Cutting (Printing identical sheets of fabric.)

HOW MUCH FABRIC SHOULD YOU BUY?

If you are willing to do some plain arithmetic, you can buy exactly what you need and not be surprised with too much or not enough.

Some surprises are fun. Some aren’t.

This article is long, so I am breaking it into two or three parts. I hope all the detail will be especially helpful to quilt shop employees and teachers.

 

Inklingo On-Point Star Quilt

Sample Inklingo Quilt (84 x 84 inches)

My example uses the free Inklingo Diamond Triangle Square shape collection for the stars and Inklingo On-Point Triangles for 4.5 inch Squares.

How much fabric do we need to fussy cut all of the gold stars to get kaleidoscope stars?

 

Window Template and Freezer Paper Template

1. FUSSY CUTTING WITH TRADITIONAL TEMPLATES
With Inklingo you can print window templates and FP templates without seam allowances, so there is no need to buy acrylic templates. (Probably better for the planet.)

This method works well when you don’t have enough fabric to print identical sheets. There are examples on the blog:

However, this is not a good alternative if you want 144 sets of 8 identical diamonds.

Unfortunately, the 3 traditional approaches for determining fabric requirements with the Swiss cheese method seem to be:

  1. Buy it all and check other quilt shops and online for more.
  2. Buy as much as you can afford.
  3. Let the amount of fabric you have determine the size of the quilt.

Easy, eh? If you plan to make Swiss cheese of the fabric, you just need to buy as much as you can.

Ten or twelve yards might not be enough—and you won’t know until you try.

The only alternative is to unfold the fabric at the shop and count sets of 8 identical shapes. That might work if you only need a fat quarter or a half yard of a particular fabric but even then it can be tricky because cutting one flower might make the surrounding designs useless because it doesn’t leave enough seam allowance. Count, but buy extra if you can!

For this method, no arithmetic is required. . . as long as you don’t mind surprises.

 

Fussy Cutting Arithmetic

2. INKLINGO NO WASTE FUSSY CUTTING
With simple arithmetic (sometimes lots of arithmetic, but all simple multiplying and dividing) you can determine exactly what you need for No Waste Fussy Cutting. If you are uncomfortable with multiplying by 12 and dividing by 36 in your head, use a calculator.

Before you leave home.

Monkey’s Cheat Sheet is perfect for staying organized.

  1. How many identical diamonds for each star?  8
  2. How many stars?  144
    You can see how simple it was to determine the number of stars when I prepared Monkey’s Cheat Sheet for a blue variation of this quilt. (12 rows of 12 stars. Easy peasy.)
    (Example of Monkey’s Cheat Sheet.)
  3. Print to take with you:
    1. Extra copy of Monkey’s Cheat Sheet
    2. Window Template, so you can preview fabric. (I carry mine in a plastic sheet protector.)
    3. Suggested Custom Page Sizes
    For Diamond Layout A, print page 47 of the shape collection (Catalogue of Shapes).

 

Suggested Custom Page Sizes for Diamonds

I need a lot of diamonds. The Suggested Custom Page Sizes on page 47 (above) show me that I would like to print 25 diamonds at a time, 7.75 x 11.5, if possible.

This tells me that a pretty fabric with a 12 inch repeat would be a luck find.

Let’s shop!

 

Inklingo Window Template

At the Quilt Shop

1. Preview fabrics with your window template to see whether the scale is suitable.

The great big flowers in this fabric make wonderful kaleidoscopes when cut into small diamonds. I might not have been able to see it without my window template.

There are suggestions for choosing fabric for fussy cutting in a video on the Main Lucy Boston Page.

In a nutshell, look for “busy” fabrics without big empty spaces or a lot of background. Choosing fabric for No Waste Fussy Cutting is similar to Stack n Whack™, One Block Wonder, and other Kaleidoscope methods.

 

Measure the repeat.

2. Measure the repeat in the design.
Common repeats are 12, 18, and 24 inches. Measure parallel to the selvage from one motif to the next identical motif.

This fabric is one of my favorites. It has a 12 inch repeat, which is common. Even after the fabric shrinks, I will have enough for a sheet of 25 diamonds (7.75 x 11.5) in each repeat, as illustrated below. PERFECT.

After washing, a 12 inch repeat is often only about 11 5/8 (11.625). There will be very little waste.

Now that I have chosen a fabric with a 12 inch repeat, how much should I buy?

 

Print 8 identical sheets of diamonds

To get 8 identical sheets, I will need to buy 8 repeats of 12 inches each, measured along the selvage. Arithmetic: 12 x 8 = 96 inches and 96 divided by 36 = 2.66 yards.

The diamonds in the positions marked * will all be identical, so those 8 diamonds will make a fabulous kaleidoscope star.

 

Print identical sheets of fabric.

Since each sheet of FP/fabric will be 7.75 inches wide, I can fit 5 across the width of the fabric because the fabric is 40-42 inches wide without selvages. Arithmetic: 7.75 x 5 = 38.75.

 

Staggered start

I prefer a staggered start (above). If you don’t stagger, you might end up with too little variation in the sets of diamonds because of the repeat across the width of the fabric. Round up from 2.66 to at least 2.75 or 3 yards. Let’s say 3 yards.

You may want to allow for 9 repeats, as described in Part 2 of this tutorial.

1000 FUSSY CUT DIAMONDS – 3 YARDS

So far, we have allowed for 8 sheets x 5 sheets across. Arithmetic: 8 x 5 = 40 sheets of 25 diamonds each and 40 x 25 = 1000.

However, Monkey’s Cheat Sheet tells us we need 1152 diamonds. Arithmetic: 8 x 144 stars = 1152, so we need 152 more diamonds for 19 more stars.

152 diamonds requires 8 identical sheets of 19 diamonds. There is no way to print only 19 diamonds at a time, so I will print 20 at a time on sheets 6.25 x 11.5. This is not one of the suggested Custom Page Sizes on page 47, but it is one row narrower than printing 25 at a time.

FOUR GOOD OPTIONS FOR THE OTHER 19 STARS

Option # 1
Double the yardage (3 x 2 = 6 yards) and print one row of sheets along the selvage of the next 3 yards too. In this case you will have lots of fabric (approx 32 x 108) to use on the back or for binding or for stash.

This is probably what I would do if I really love the fabric.

Option # 2
Make the other 19 stars without fussy cutting (no kaleidoscope effect), and just buy enough for 8 more sheets of 20 diamonds.

8 more sheets requires 24 inches (diagram above). Arithmetic: 24 divided by 36 = 0.66 yards, round up to 0.75 yards.

Total yardage for diamonds is therefore 3.75 yards. Arithmetic: 3 + 0.75 = 3.75.

This is a good solution if you cannot do Option # 1, either because of the expense or because there is only 3.75 yards left on the bolt.

 

Modified Inklingo Star Quilt

Option # 3
Modify the quilt layout so 20 of the stars would be from a different fabric (red stars, above). You might even like the modified design better!

Option # 4
Examine the repeat ACROSS the fabric for the remaining 19 stars. The repeat in the design that we normally rely upon is the one parallel to the selvage, but designs also repeat across the width of the fabric.

The design at the selvage might be repeated 2, 3, or more times in the same 12 inch strip across the width of the fabric. If you can find 3 repeats across, for 8 sheets you would need 3 more repeats (12 x 3) to get 8 or 9 identical sheets of 20 diamonds.

Seeing the repeat across the width of the fabric can be tricky, so ask someone at the quilt shop to help.

TO BE CONTINUED. . .

That is a lot of info already, but we have more tips to share that give you more options when you are determining how much fabric to buy, so please stay tuned.

In the meantime, you might enjoy these articles too.

Fussy Cutting is a hot topic!

 

Inklingo No Waste Fussy Cutting for 6 pointed Stars!

SUBSCRIBED?

Part 2 of this tutorial also discusses how to determine yardage requirements for other shapes, like 6-pointed stars and Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC).

Please subscribe (top of right sidebar), so you don’t miss what is coming next! If you follow Inkingo on Facebook you might even get a sneak peek.

Thank you for visiting.

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  8 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

You do NOT have to have a Facebook account to see what I post on the Inklingo Facebook page.
If you do have a FB account, please like my page and choose “Get Notifications” or Facebook will make me pay to show you what I post.
Facebook only shows my photos to about 16% of the quilters who have liked the page unless I agree to pay.

Thank you for subscribing to the blog!

Inklingo Castle Wall 9 inch

From the front, hand and machine pieced blocks look the same.

Inklingo Castle Wall is a hand piecer’s dream.
Portable. Precise. Fun. 3 sizes. Impressive! Lots of inset seams = relaxing continuous stitching.

Should we tell machine piecers, “No, no, no. This is not for you.” ? I think not!

We want to include ALL quilters in the fun and Inklingo makes it easier to machine piece a fortress of inset seams!

 

Castle Wall has lots of inset seams!

INSET SEAMS

Hand piecers love inset seams.

Machine piecers avoid them. Not anymore, okay?

Inset seams are a hand piecer’s friend because you can turn a corner and keep on sewing. “Continuous stitching” is relaxing and fun and gives perfect results with fewer knots.

Inset seams often scare machine piecers away from beautiful designs like Castle Wall because it is difficult to judge where to start and stop sewing. Precision markings printed with Inklingo change all that.

There is no need to avoid inset seams when you print the shapes on fabric with Inklingo!

In my last message, there is a video showing inset seams by machine (hexagon example).

You can do it too!

 

Sew from crosshair to crosshair.

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

Machine piecers usually sew from edge to edge and often sew through several layers of fabric where seams cross.

Hand piecers always sew from crosshair to crosshair (not edge to edge) and only ever sew through 2 layers of fabric. That gives more flexibility for sewing sequence and means all the pressing can be left to the end. (No more press as you go.)

Monkey is a hand piecing snob. He says sewing from crosshair to crosshair is “hand piecing by machine.” With crosshairs and precision corners printed accurately on every piece with Inklingo, machine piecers can sew from crosshair to crosshair too.

 

Inklingo Castle Wall by Machine

WHAT’S THE SAME?

Whether you sew by hand or by machine:

  • Sew crosshair to crosshair.
  • Start and end each seam with a backstitch or locking stitch.
  • Sew the seams in any order, but plan your route for “continuous stitching” and/or minimal pinning if you can.
  • Use the same sewing sequence for hand piecing and machine piecing.
  • Leave all the pressing to the end.

 

Castle Wall by Machine

BONUS – HYBRID PIECING

You can combine hand and machine sewing in the same block!

Last night I planned to sew as many seams as I could by machine and then finish the block by hand while watching TV with Russ.

My plan did not work out.

  1. I finished these two Castle Wall blocks (above) by machine before our show started!
    (I sewed hexagons on the couch instead. Nice)
  2. My idea for a different sewing sequence for machine piecing did not have any advantages compared to just using the normal sewing sequence for Castle Wall by hand.
    (Things often seem harder/easier/better/worse in theory. You have to actually do it to know for sure.)

You can finish a machine pieced block by hand—or vice versa.

Problem: If you finish fast by machine, you might not have anything to pack in your portable kit.
Solution: Print some more!

Hybrid piecing is described in detail in The Inklingo Handbook. It is only possible because Inklingo prints accurate lines for every shape.

 

Inklingo Castle Wall precision corners.

OBSERVATIONS

  • Even without trimming the corners, Inklingo’s precision markings help align everything correctly (arrows above). If your machine has a walking foot, you may not need to pin at all but if you do, pin at the two crosshairs.
  • Use the same sewing sequence for machine and hand piecing.
  • Stitch from crosshair to crosshair and start and end each seam with a backstitch–by hand or by machine.

 

How to press Castle Wall.

MORE OBSERVATIONS

  • Press the same way whether you sew by hand OR by machine.
  • Sew by machine when you can and sew by hand when you need it to be portable and/or quiet.
  • Castle Wall 4.5 inch and Castle Wall 6 inch are harder to sew by machine than Castle Wall 9 inch. Stick to the larger sizes for machine piecing.
  • Fussy cutting a great fabric makes each block even more fun no matter whether you print Inklingo templates to make Swiss cheese of the fabric OR you print the shapes on fabric with No Waste Fussy Cutting.

VIDEO

The video on YouTube and on the Main Hexagon Page on the website (under the Shop tab) shows all of my best tips for machine piecing from crosshair to crosshair.

I know you can do it too, but if you are hesitant you can try before you buy.  Practice sewing from crosshair to crosshair by machine with the shape in the free Diamond Triangle Square shape collection. It’s probably easier than you think! (How to sew LeMoyne Star by Machine.)

 

Inklingo fussy cutting

MORE CASTLE WALL LESSONS

I have added “How to Machine Piece Castle Wall” to the list of lessons on the Main Castle Wall Page.

You can see my first machine pieced Castle Wall block here.

SUBSCRIBED?

Even if you normally hand piece, I hope you will “Attack a Castle Wall” by machine and enjoy it as much as I did. It just might boost your confidence about precision machine piecing—and you can brag at your next guild meeting!

Please subscribe (top of right sidebar), so you don’t miss what is coming next! If you follow Inkingo on Facebook you will often get a sneak peek.

Thank you for visiting.

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  8 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

You do NOT have to have a Facebook account to see what I post on the Inklingo Facebook page.
If you do have a FB account, please like my page and choose “Get Notifications” or Facebook will make me pay to show you what I post.
Facebook only shows my photos to about 16% of the quilters who have liked the page unless I agree to pay.

Thank you for subscribing to the blog!

Inklingo Castle Wall by Machine

I couldn’t resist.

I wanted to try sewing Castle Wall by machine.

It is one formidable fortress of inset seams! Could I do it?

YES!

Isn’t it pretty?

 

Cotton Drapery Fabric

I fell in love with this drapery fabric. It is a little bit heavier than normal quilting cotton. Who could resist the colors and the movement in it? Not me.

 

Inklingo Window Template

The designs are big. I printed on scrap paper with Castle Wall 9 inch to make a window template, so I could preview the flowers. Some of them are small enough for the octagon.

 

Inklingo Freezer Paper Template for Fussy Cutting

FUSSY CUTTING

There are two Inklingo fussy cutting methods.

1. No Waste Fussy Cutting
I only have about 1.5 yards (two repeats of the design), and there is quite a bit of empty space (plain background), so this fabric is not suitable for the “no waste” method.

2. Traditional Fussy Cutting with Templates
This is the method that makes Swiss cheese of the fabric. It is more work and it is wasteful but it is worth it sometimes.

I printed the Inklingo octagon with no seam allowances on freezer paper to make the template, ironed it in position on the wrong side of the fabric (with a little help from my window template), added the seam allowances when I rotary cut, and drew the lines with a mechanical pencil. (Template tips.)

I prefer to print all of the shapes, but I can combine shapes with pencil lines with the shapes I print.

 

Print shapes on fabric with your Inkjet.

I printed three sheets of fabric using Inklingo Castle Wall 9 inch and Custom Page Sizes, using the info in the shape collection.

  • Cream background, Combo 2 (HST and Squares) — 7.75 x 9 inches
  • Pink Diamonds, Layout D — 4.75 x 10.5
  • Blue Trapezoids, Layout 1 — 7 x 8.25

I just used scraps and I did not use my favorite flower because I wasn’t sure I would love the results by machine. This was just supposed to be a test.

 

Rotary cut on the lines.

CUTTING

Rotary cut rows, stack the rows and cut 4 layers at a time.

No measuring or special templates. Fast.

 

Inklingo printed, cut, and ready to sew!

Ready to sew!

The fussy cutting took the longest, but I think it is time well spent. (Time with fabric is always well spent, isn’t it?)

 

Sew from crosshair to crosshair.

PINNING AND SEWING

I pin at the beginning and end of the seam and sew from crosshair to crosshair, taking one backstitch at the beginning and end of each seam. (Video below)

 

Sew through two layers.

I thought the intersection where a diamond meets the octagon and two squares might be tricky but I sewed toward the octagon and finger pressed the other seam allowances out of the way—and it worked perfectly!

I used the same sewing sequence as for hand pieced Castle Wall blocks, illustrated here.

 

All of the seams are the same length.

All of the seams are the same length, and the default stitch length fit well. (Notice that I sew beside the line for a scant 0.25 inch seam allowance.)

 

Inklingo pressing detail

PRESSING

Since I only sewed through two layers and NOT through the crossing seam allowances, I was able to leave all of the pressing to the end, just the way I do when I hand piece.

I used the same pressing method as for hand pieced Castle Wall blocks.

 

Inklingo Video - Hexagons by Machine

VIDEO

This video shows all of my best tips for machine piecing from crosshair to crosshair. The example uses hexagons but it is exactly the same for Castle Wall.

The video is on YouTube and on the Main Hexagon Page on the website (under the Shop tab).

 

Inklingo Castle Wall by Machine - Detail

I think my results by machine are just as good as they would have been by hand and it was fast!

The block is exactly 9.5 x 9.5 inches (9 inches finished), so my scant 0.25 inch seam allowances worked.

The precision corners and precise sewing lines printed with Inklingo made all the difference. It surprised me how well it worked.

I don’t think the results would have been as good if I had drawn all of the lines manually.

I could not have done it at all without precise crosshairs on the fabric to mark exactly where to start and stop stitching.

MORE CASTLE WALL LESSONS

I have added “How to Machine Piece Castle Wall” to the list of lessons on the Main Castle Wall Page.

SUBSCRIBED?

“Attacking a Castle Wall” by machine was a great adventure. I hope you will enjoy it as much as I did.

Please subscribe (top of right sidebar), so you don’t miss what is coming next!

Thank you for visiting.

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  8 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

You do NOT have to have a Facebook account to see what I post on the Inklingo Facebook page.
If you do have a FB account, please like my page and choose “Get Notifications” or Facebook will make me pay to show you what I post.
Facebook only shows my photos to about 16% of the quilters who have liked the page unless I agree to pay.

Thank you for subscribing to the blog!

Inklingo Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) by Debbie in Kentucky

Debbie in Kentucky WOW-ed everyone when she posted photos of her Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses blocks on Facebook recently.

TWO METHODS OF FUSSY CUTTING WITH INKLINGO

I keep seeing online messages indicating that “you can’t fussy cut with Inklingo.”

This is sooooooo WRONG!

Debbie knows! There are two ways to fussy cut with Inklingo!

One method lets you cut exactly the design you want and makes “Swiss cheese” of the fabric and the other uses the fabric very efficiently but you don’t choose the designs in each shape.

 

Inklingo No Waste Fussy Cutting

1. No Waste Fussy Cutting

Find the repeat in the fabric along the selvage and print as many identical sheets of fabric as you need identical shapes.

This method is similar to One Block Wonder, Kaleidoscope and Stack n Whack™ techniques, but simpler—no stacking!

This method is also similar to Stack n Whack™ and the other methods in that the results are random. (Tips for choosing fabric, below)

You can choose Inklingo Custom Page Sizes that work well with common repeats (12 inch, 24 inch, etc.)

Instructions
If you understand the idea of printing identical sheets of fabric, you are all set but there are detailed instructions in several places with our best tips. This article on QuiltingHub is a good place to start.

 

Traditional fussy cutting with Inklingo

2. Traditional Templates

If you don’t have enough fabric to be able to print several identical sheets of shapes or if you want to choose exactly which flower or other design to use, you can still fussy cut with Inklingo!

Inklingo shape collections include the shapes without seam allowances to print on freezer paper or other template material, so you can fussy cut the traditional way.

With this method, you choose exactly which flower or other design to feature. This is different from the random effect of No Waste Fussy Cutting, Stack n Whack™ and others. (Tips for choosing fabric, below)

Templates printed with Inklingo on freezer paper are better than acrylic templates for fussy cutting (no slipping and sliding), and there is no extra expense for pre-cut papers or acrylic templates!

You can use shapes prepared with templates with shapes printed with Inklingo—the best of both worlds—and sew by machine or by hand.

Instructions

 

Inklingo Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) by Debbie in Kentucky

I loved seeing Debbie’s blocks on Facebook and she graciously gave me permission to feature her POTC blocks on the blog too.

 

Inklingo Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) by Debbie in Kentucky

In Debbie’s own words:

Without Inklingo, I would never be doing hexies. I’ve tried EPP several times and hated it every time! With Inklingo, the hexies look better, you can’t see the stitches (my pet peeve with EPP), and they are so fast and easy it’s almost ridiculous!! I love hexies now (but only because of Inklingo!!)!  

 

Inklingo Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) by Debbie in Kentucky

This is going to be an amazing quilt.

“IDENTICAL”?

By the way, if you are worried that there are slight variations in your “identical” shapes, please have a look at the close-up detail of the blocks in the original quilt made by Lucy Boston in the book (especially page 10).

The charm of some of the blocks is greater because she did not cut identical motifs with mechanical precision. Small variations seem more lively and interesting, not rigid and sterile.

We aim for precision but little variations can be delightful!

 

Debbie's fabric for POTC

This image shows sections of 3 of Debbie’s fabrics.

Debbie is working with fat quarters, so she does not have enough fabric for No Waste Fussy Cutting. She used templates to cut identical motifs instead.

It was not as easy as using the perfectly printed Inklingo lines which some of the hexies did have but it was the only solution I could come up with to make the fat quarters work.  In the end, I think it was worth the effort but yardage and the leeway to get the correct repeats would have been much easier!!!

 

Inklingo is handy for printing a window template too.

CHOOSING FABRIC FOR FUSSY CUTTING

You can print Inklingo shapes on paper to make a Window Template to preview fabric in your stash and in the quilt shop. This is the method taught in Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) and on the blog.

There is also video about choosing fabric on the Main Lucy Boston Page.

The window template is easier to use than an acrylic template for previewing what you want to cut and you can print as many window templates as you need.

We have been sharing Kaleidoscope Stars on the blog for years. You can search “kaleidoscope” to see some of the fabrics we have used in the past.

 

Print shapes on fabric with Inklingo

As usual, when you use Inklingo, it is easier to determine how much fabric is required too. You can see GFG flowers with this fabric on the blog too.

 

Inklingo Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) by Debbie in Kentucky

If anyone asks you whether you can fussy cut with Inklingo, now you know the answer! YES!

If you want to see blocks like Debbie’s whenever they are posted on Facebook, please “like” the Inklingo Page and choose “Get Notifications” from the dropdown menu under Like.

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Thank you, Debbie, for allowing me to show your wonderful Patchwork of the Crosses blocks here. I hope you will share photos of the rest of them too.

Thank you for visiting.

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

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Facebook only shows my photos to about 16% of the quilters who have liked the page unless I agree to pay.

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