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Inklingo Castle Wall 9 inch

From the front, hand and machine pieced blocks look the same.

Inklingo Castle Wall is a hand piecer’s dream.
Portable. Precise. Fun. 3 sizes. Impressive! Lots of inset seams = relaxing continuous stitching.

Should we tell machine piecers, “No, no, no. This is not for you.” ? I think not!

We want to include ALL quilters in the fun and Inklingo makes it easier to machine piece a fortress of inset seams!

 

Castle Wall has lots of inset seams!

INSET SEAMS

Hand piecers love inset seams.

Machine piecers avoid them. Not anymore, okay?

Inset seams are a hand piecer’s friend because you can turn a corner and keep on sewing. “Continuous stitching” is relaxing and fun and gives perfect results with fewer knots.

Inset seams often scare machine piecers away from beautiful designs like Castle Wall because it is difficult to judge where to start and stop sewing. Precision markings printed with Inklingo change all that.

There is no need to avoid inset seams when you print the shapes on fabric with Inklingo!

In my last message, there is a video showing inset seams by machine (hexagon example).

You can do it too!

 

Sew from crosshair to crosshair.

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

Machine piecers usually sew from edge to edge and often sew through several layers of fabric where seams cross.

Hand piecers always sew from crosshair to crosshair (not edge to edge) and only ever sew through 2 layers of fabric. That gives more flexibility for sewing sequence and means all the pressing can be left to the end. (No more press as you go.)

Monkey is a hand piecing snob. He says sewing from crosshair to crosshair is “hand piecing by machine.” With crosshairs and precision corners printed accurately on every piece with Inklingo, machine piecers can sew from crosshair to crosshair too.

 

Inklingo Castle Wall by Machine

WHAT’S THE SAME?

Whether you sew by hand or by machine:

  • Sew crosshair to crosshair.
  • Start and end each seam with a backstitch or locking stitch.
  • Sew the seams in any order, but plan your route for “continuous stitching” and/or minimal pinning if you can.
  • Use the same sewing sequence for hand piecing and machine piecing.
  • Leave all the pressing to the end.

 

Castle Wall by Machine

BONUS – HYBRID PIECING

You can combine hand and machine sewing in the same block!

Last night I planned to sew as many seams as I could by machine and then finish the block by hand while watching TV with Russ.

My plan did not work out.

  1. I finished these two Castle Wall blocks (above) by machine before our show started!
    (I sewed hexagons on the couch instead. Nice)
  2. My idea for a different sewing sequence for machine piecing did not have any advantages compared to just using the normal sewing sequence for Castle Wall by hand.
    (Things often seem harder/easier/better/worse in theory. You have to actually do it to know for sure.)

You can finish a machine pieced block by hand—or vice versa.

Problem: If you finish fast by machine, you might not have anything to pack in your portable kit.
Solution: Print some more!

Hybrid piecing is described in detail in The Inklingo Handbook. It is only possible because Inklingo prints accurate lines for every shape.

 

Inklingo Castle Wall precision corners.

OBSERVATIONS

  • Even without trimming the corners, Inklingo’s precision markings help align everything correctly (arrows above). If your machine has a walking foot, you may not need to pin at all but if you do, pin at the two crosshairs.
  • Use the same sewing sequence for machine and hand piecing.
  • Stitch from crosshair to crosshair and start and end each seam with a backstitch–by hand or by machine.

 

How to press Castle Wall.

MORE OBSERVATIONS

  • Press the same way whether you sew by hand OR by machine.
  • Sew by machine when you can and sew by hand when you need it to be portable and/or quiet.
  • Castle Wall 4.5 inch and Castle Wall 6 inch are harder to sew by machine than Castle Wall 9 inch. Stick to the larger sizes for machine piecing.
  • Fussy cutting a great fabric makes each block even more fun no matter whether you print Inklingo templates to make Swiss cheese of the fabric OR you print the shapes on fabric with No Waste Fussy Cutting.

VIDEO

The video on YouTube and on the Main Hexagon Page on the website (under the Shop tab) shows all of my best tips for machine piecing from crosshair to crosshair.

I know you can do it too, but if you are hesitant you can try before you buy.  Practice sewing from crosshair to crosshair by machine with the shape in the free Diamond Triangle Square shape collection. It’s probably easier than you think! (How to sew LeMoyne Star by Machine.)

 

Inklingo fussy cutting

MORE CASTLE WALL LESSONS

I have added “How to Machine Piece Castle Wall” to the list of lessons on the Main Castle Wall Page.

You can see my first machine pieced Castle Wall block here.

SUBSCRIBED?

Even if you normally hand piece, I hope you will “Attack a Castle Wall” by machine and enjoy it as much as I did. It just might boost your confidence about precision machine piecing—and you can brag at your next guild meeting!

Please subscribe (top of right sidebar), so you don’t miss what is coming next! If you follow Inkingo on Facebook you will often get a sneak peek.

Thank you for visiting.

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  8 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

You do NOT have to have a Facebook account to see what I post on the Inklingo Facebook page.
If you do have a FB account, please like my page and choose “Get Notifications” or Facebook will make me pay to show you what I post.
Facebook only shows my photos to about 16% of the quilters who have liked the page unless I agree to pay.

Thank you for subscribing to the blog!

Inklingo Castle Wall by Machine

I couldn’t resist.

I wanted to try sewing Castle Wall by machine.

It is one formidable fortress of inset seams! Could I do it?

YES!

Isn’t it pretty?

 

Cotton Drapery Fabric

I fell in love with this drapery fabric. It is a little bit heavier than normal quilting cotton. Who could resist the colors and the movement in it? Not me.

 

Inklingo Window Template

The designs are big. I printed on scrap paper with Castle Wall 9 inch to make a window template, so I could preview the flowers. Some of them are small enough for the octagon.

 

Inklingo Freezer Paper Template for Fussy Cutting

FUSSY CUTTING

There are two Inklingo fussy cutting methods.

1. No Waste Fussy Cutting
I only have about 1.5 yards (two repeats of the design), and there is quite a bit of empty space (plain background), so this fabric is not suitable for the “no waste” method.

2. Traditional Fussy Cutting with Templates
This is the method that makes Swiss cheese of the fabric. It is more work and it is wasteful but it is worth it sometimes.

I printed the Inklingo octagon with no seam allowances on freezer paper to make the template, ironed it in position on the wrong side of the fabric (with a little help from my window template), added the seam allowances when I rotary cut, and drew the lines with a mechanical pencil. (Template tips.)

I prefer to print all of the shapes, but I can combine shapes with pencil lines with the shapes I print.

 

Print shapes on fabric with your Inkjet.

I printed three sheets of fabric using Inklingo Castle Wall 9 inch and Custom Page Sizes, using the info in the shape collection.

  • Cream background, Combo 2 (HST and Squares) — 7.75 x 9 inches
  • Pink Diamonds, Layout D — 4.75 x 10.5
  • Blue Trapezoids, Layout 1 — 7 x 8.25

I just used scraps and I did not use my favorite flower because I wasn’t sure I would love the results by machine. This was just supposed to be a test.

 

Rotary cut on the lines.

CUTTING

Rotary cut rows, stack the rows and cut 4 layers at a time.

No measuring or special templates. Fast.

 

Inklingo printed, cut, and ready to sew!

Ready to sew!

The fussy cutting took the longest, but I think it is time well spent. (Time with fabric is always well spent, isn’t it?)

 

Sew from crosshair to crosshair.

PINNING AND SEWING

I pin at the beginning and end of the seam and sew from crosshair to crosshair, taking one backstitch at the beginning and end of each seam. (Video below)

 

Sew through two layers.

I thought the intersection where a diamond meets the octagon and two squares might be tricky but I sewed toward the octagon and finger pressed the other seam allowances out of the way—and it worked perfectly!

I used the same sewing sequence as for hand pieced Castle Wall blocks, illustrated here.

 

All of the seams are the same length.

All of the seams are the same length, and the default stitch length fit well. (Notice that I sew beside the line for a scant 0.25 inch seam allowance.)

 

Inklingo pressing detail

PRESSING

Since I only sewed through two layers and NOT through the crossing seam allowances, I was able to leave all of the pressing to the end, just the way I do when I hand piece.

I used the same pressing method as for hand pieced Castle Wall blocks.

 

Inklingo Video - Hexagons by Machine

VIDEO

This video shows all of my best tips for machine piecing from crosshair to crosshair. The example uses hexagons but it is exactly the same for Castle Wall.

The video is on YouTube and on the Main Hexagon Page on the website (under the Shop tab).

 

Inklingo Castle Wall by Machine - Detail

I think my results by machine are just as good as they would have been by hand and it was fast!

The block is exactly 9.5 x 9.5 inches (9 inches finished), so my scant 0.25 inch seam allowances worked.

The precision corners and precise sewing lines printed with Inklingo made all the difference. It surprised me how well it worked.

I don’t think the results would have been as good if I had drawn all of the lines manually.

I could not have done it at all without precise crosshairs on the fabric to mark exactly where to start and stop stitching.

MORE CASTLE WALL LESSONS

I have added “How to Machine Piece Castle Wall” to the list of lessons on the Main Castle Wall Page.

SUBSCRIBED?

“Attacking a Castle Wall” by machine was a great adventure. I hope you will enjoy it as much as I did.

Please subscribe (top of right sidebar), so you don’t miss what is coming next!

Thank you for visiting.

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  8 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

You do NOT have to have a Facebook account to see what I post on the Inklingo Facebook page.
If you do have a FB account, please like my page and choose “Get Notifications” or Facebook will make me pay to show you what I post.
Facebook only shows my photos to about 16% of the quilters who have liked the page unless I agree to pay.

Thank you for subscribing to the blog!

Inklingo Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) by Debbie in Kentucky

Debbie in Kentucky WOW-ed everyone when she posted photos of her Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses blocks on Facebook recently.

TWO METHODS OF FUSSY CUTTING WITH INKLINGO

I keep seeing online messages indicating that “you can’t fussy cut with Inklingo.”

This is sooooooo WRONG!

Debbie knows! There are two ways to fussy cut with Inklingo!

One method lets you cut exactly the design you want and makes “Swiss cheese” of the fabric and the other uses the fabric very efficiently but you don’t choose the designs in each shape.

 

Inklingo No Waste Fussy Cutting

1. No Waste Fussy Cutting

Find the repeat in the fabric along the selvage and print as many identical sheets of fabric as you need identical shapes.

This method is similar to One Block Wonder, Kaleidoscope and Stack n Whack™ techniques, but simpler—no stacking!

This method is also similar to Stack n Whack™ and the other methods in that the results are random. (Tips for choosing fabric, below)

You can choose Inklingo Custom Page Sizes that work well with common repeats (12 inch, 24 inch, etc.)

Instructions
If you understand the idea of printing identical sheets of fabric, you are all set but there are detailed instructions in several places with our best tips. This article on QuiltingHub is a good place to start.

 

Traditional fussy cutting with Inklingo

2. Traditional Templates

If you don’t have enough fabric to be able to print several identical sheets of shapes or if you want to choose exactly which flower or other design to use, you can still fussy cut with Inklingo!

Inklingo shape collections include the shapes without seam allowances to print on freezer paper or other template material, so you can fussy cut the traditional way.

With this method, you choose exactly which flower or other design to feature. This is different from the random effect of No Waste Fussy Cutting, Stack n Whack™ and others. (Tips for choosing fabric, below)

Templates printed with Inklingo on freezer paper are better than acrylic templates for fussy cutting (no slipping and sliding), and there is no extra expense for pre-cut papers or acrylic templates!

You can use shapes prepared with templates with shapes printed with Inklingo—the best of both worlds—and sew by machine or by hand.

Instructions

 

Inklingo Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) by Debbie in Kentucky

I loved seeing Debbie’s blocks on Facebook and she graciously gave me permission to feature her POTC blocks on the blog too.

 

Inklingo Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) by Debbie in Kentucky

In Debbie’s own words:

Without Inklingo, I would never be doing hexies. I’ve tried EPP several times and hated it every time! With Inklingo, the hexies look better, you can’t see the stitches (my pet peeve with EPP), and they are so fast and easy it’s almost ridiculous!! I love hexies now (but only because of Inklingo!!)!  

 

Inklingo Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) by Debbie in Kentucky

This is going to be an amazing quilt.

“IDENTICAL”?

By the way, if you are worried that there are slight variations in your “identical” shapes, please have a look at the close-up detail of the blocks in the original quilt made by Lucy Boston in the book (especially page 10).

The charm of some of the blocks is greater because she did not cut identical motifs with mechanical precision. Small variations seem more lively and interesting, not rigid and sterile.

We aim for precision but little variations can be delightful!

 

Debbie's fabric for POTC

This image shows sections of 3 of Debbie’s fabrics.

Debbie is working with fat quarters, so she does not have enough fabric for No Waste Fussy Cutting. She used templates to cut identical motifs instead.

It was not as easy as using the perfectly printed Inklingo lines which some of the hexies did have but it was the only solution I could come up with to make the fat quarters work.  In the end, I think it was worth the effort but yardage and the leeway to get the correct repeats would have been much easier!!!

 

Inklingo is handy for printing a window template too.

CHOOSING FABRIC FOR FUSSY CUTTING

You can print Inklingo shapes on paper to make a Window Template to preview fabric in your stash and in the quilt shop. This is the method taught in Lucy Boston Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) and on the blog.

There is also video about choosing fabric on the Main Lucy Boston Page.

The window template is easier to use than an acrylic template for previewing what you want to cut and you can print as many window templates as you need.

We have been sharing Kaleidoscope Stars on the blog for years. You can search “kaleidoscope” to see some of the fabrics we have used in the past.

 

Print shapes on fabric with Inklingo

As usual, when you use Inklingo, it is easier to determine how much fabric is required too. You can see GFG flowers with this fabric on the blog too.

 

Inklingo Patchwork of the Crosses (POTC) by Debbie in Kentucky

If anyone asks you whether you can fussy cut with Inklingo, now you know the answer! YES!

If you want to see blocks like Debbie’s whenever they are posted on Facebook, please “like” the Inklingo Page and choose “Get Notifications” from the dropdown menu under Like.

SUBSCRIBED?

Please subscribe (top of right sidebar), so you don’t miss what is coming next!

Thank you, Debbie, for allowing me to show your wonderful Patchwork of the Crosses blocks here. I hope you will share photos of the rest of them too.

Thank you for visiting.

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  8 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

You do NOT have to have a Facebook account to see what I post on the Inklingo Facebook page.
If you do have a FB account, please like my page and choose “Get Notifications” or Facebook will make me pay to show you what I post.
Facebook only shows my photos to about 16% of the quilters who have liked the page unless I agree to pay.

Thank you for subscribing to the blog!

Template Tips

Last time, I explained why my favorite template material is freezer paper.

This time, I am sharing my best tips for using templates with Inklingo.

These tips are based on my original instructions for using freezer paper templates in Quilted Diamonds (2002 and 2004 with DVD), but some are helpful even if you are using acrylic or other templates, okay?

 

P1140880-curl

We prefer printing the shapes on fabric, but if we need templates, we use FP.

1. Take the curl out!

If you are using FP on a roll, the curl can be annoying. Some quilters store sheets of FP under books. A faster way is to iron FP to the ironing board cover and peel it off.  Quick and easy. It removes the curl and it doesn’t “use it up” because FP can be used over and over again.

2. Trace or print the shapes onto FP.

If your printer doesn’t feed light-weight FP sheets well, you can iron the leading edge to a sheet of regular paper (just the first 0.25 inch or so) and feed the two layers through together. With the right amount of heat (no steam), the FP will peel off neatly after printing.

 

Rotary cut the freezer paper.

3. Rotary cut the freezer paper.

There is no measuring, so you can use any acrylic ruler as a straight edge. Cut several layers at a time if you need lots of templates. You might want to designate one cutter just for cutting paper. (I use the same one I use for cutting fabric.)

IMPORTANT Use a sharp blade in your rotary cutter because it is safer! When a blade gets dull and you press harder, it is more likely that you will lose control.

 

Mark straight grain on the FP templates.

4. Mark straight grain on each template.

Review the instructions and the layouts in the shape collection to see how to position templates for correct straight grain.

Whenever possible, there should be straight grain on the outside edges of a block.

For example, if this triangle will be used on the four corners of a block, be sure you have straight grain on the two short sides (half square triangles, HST above), not the long side (quarter square triangles, QST above).

 

Use strips of fabric for efficiency.

5. Pre-cut strips of fabric to the right size.

If you are cutting several of one shape, like the squares or hexagons, it is efficient to cut the fabric into strips first.

A strip of colored paper 0.5 inches wide is a handy tool. It allows for two 0.25 inch seam allowances.

You can determine the correct width without measuring or math. Just position the template with correct straight grain and allow for two seam allowances (the width of the orange paper), as shown.

 

Use a 0.5 inch spacer between shapes.

6. Space the templates exactly 0.5 inch apart.

Accurate spacing saves fabric and eliminates extra cuts.

Press the templates in position on the wrong side of the fabric with a hot, dry iron. The plastic coated side of the FP sticks to the fabric with a temporary bond.

With the right amount of heat, the templates will stick securely but still peel off easily enough to be used over and over and over again.

Other templates slip and slide. Gotta love freezer paper!

 

Add the seam allowance when you cut.

7. Add the 0.25 inch seam allowance when you rotary cut.

There is no need to draw the cutting lines whether you use a rotary cutter or scissors.

If you cut with scissors, you can cut accurately enough by “rock of eye” without a line.

 

Choose the lightest, finest line.

8. Mark the lightest, finest line possible.

Choosing the right marker is important! These examples show a dramatic difference.

You want the lightest, finest line you can see. Use the ultra-fine lines printed by Inklingo as your goal (above).

Use a mechanical pencil and a light touch to mark the stitching lines.

Pencils make a wider line than Inklingo, so you will need to concentrate when you are sewing. Avoid markers which create a heavy line. It more difficult to sew accurately and it leaves more ink in the quilt than Inklingo does, too.

 

Leave the shapes on the cutting mat when you draw the lines.

9. Leave the shapes on your cutting mat when you draw the lines.

If the fabric drags under the pencil, it reduces accuracy and loosens the freezer paper from the fabric. It is easier to draw the seam lines with the fabric lying on the cutting mat or on a very fine sandpaper surface.

Leave the FP on the fabric until the lines have been drawn.

Use a ruler as a straight edge when you are marking the lines. A thin, flexible ruler is best. An acrylic ruler casts a shadow and makes it difficult to see. Just use your acrylic ruler for rotary cutting, not for marking the sewing lines.

Don’t store your favorite sunglasses anywhere near a sandpaper surface, okay?

NOTE  If you are machine piecing and you have cut accurate 0.25 inch seam allowances, you don’t have to mark these lines at all unless you want to.

 

Marking on dark fabric.

10. Use other markers for dark fabric.

Try white or silver pencils like Berol Verithin (and a really good sharpener) or a mechanical pencil with white or yellow lead, like these from Clover.

You might be surprised by how easy it is to print dark fabric with Inklingo because there is a choice of 20 line weights/colors. See the Top Ten Tutes.

NICE TO HAVE Good lighting and a rotating mat are helpful when you are marking lines and rotary cutting. Even if you don’t normally need reading glasses, you might find them helpful if the lighting is less than perfect.

 

Add a third line on sharp points.

11. Extend the pencil lines beyond the freezer paper for crosshairs.

The crosshairs make everything easy. With crosshairs, you know where to pin and where to start and stop sewing, especially for inset seams or any time you are hand sewing. (Of course you can sew these shapes by machine if you prefer.)

On very sharp points mark a third line across the first two at the point of the freezer paper above). Mark the matches too when you are drawing the seam lines, especially on long seams (#8 above).

 

Run a highlighter around the edge to make it easier to see.

12. Make the FP contrast with the fabric, if necessary.

If it is hard to see the edge of a white FP template against a light or white fabric,  run a highlighter around the edge first to make it easier to see.

 

Inklingo Combo Layout

13. Nest shapes to use fabric efficiently.

When you are positioning the FP for several different shapes on the same fabric, you will want to nest the shapes to avoid waste. Review the Inklingo Combo layouts in the shape collection for ideas.

For example, there are 7 different combo layouts in each of the three Inklingo Castle Wall shape collections.

14. Trim dog ears.

Review the Inklingo layouts with seam allowances to see how to trim dog ears. When you print Inklingo shapes on fabric they have precision corners (above).

You can print Inklingo shapes with seam allowances on paper to create a trimming guide. If you don’t buy fiddly extra acrylic tools, you’ll have more money to buy fabric and chocolate ice cream.

15. Make notes on your templates!

One of the lovely things about FP templates is that you can write on them.

  • straight grain
  • which fabric to use
  • numbers for sewing sequence
  • which side is “up”?
  • pattern name
  • haiku and other poems?
  • date?

A few notes are worthwhile especially since FP templates can be used over and over and over again.

 

Glassine envelopes are perfect for storing templates.

16. Store your templates in glassine envelopes.

Glassines are commonly used by stamp collectors, so you should be able to find them in any hobby shop. I still have all of my templates from Quilted Diamonds, Quilted Diamonds 2, and even Dear Jane!

 Inklingo Freezer Paper Templates

MONKEY’S BONUS TIP
Switching from Inklingo to templates and back again can be confusing because sometimes we iron the freezer paper to the right side of the fabric (so we can print on the wrong side with Inklingo) and sometimes we iron the freezer paper to the wrong side of the fabric (so we can draw the stitching lines manually).

In the early days when I was switching from Quilted Diamonds to Inklingo I had to pay Monkey a nickel every time I did it wrong.

 

Print quilt shapes on fabric with Inklingo.

MY BONUS TIP
Print the shapes on fabric whenever you can!

MIX IT UP!

You can use the shapes you make with templates with ones you print with Inklingo.

Whether you print the shapes on fabric with Inklingo or use templates, always sew a scant 0.25 inch seam allowance by machine or by hand.

SEWING & PRESSING INSTRUCTIONS & DESIGN NOTES

Complete instructions for printing, sewing and pressing are provided for all Inklingo shape collections. They are usually included in the shape collection itself, but there are some special cases.

For example, all of the instructions for Bonnie Hunter’s Celtic Solstice shape collection are on the blog instead of in the shape collection. Mysteries are a special situation.

The instructions for Castle Wall are on the All About Inklingo blog.

The instructions are in a separate, free “design book” for Hexagons, Storm At Sea, Feathered Star, Drunkard’s Path, Sunflower, Double Wedding Ring, Winding Ways, Dresden Plate, and others. The Hunter’s Star Design Book is free for a limited time, even without buying the shapes to print on fabric.

TEMPLATES FOR DESIGNERS

Inklingo shape collections make good business sense for designers.

If your favorite designer usually offers acrylic templates, you can suggest a shape collection from Inklingo as another option.

Many designers are not familiar with Inklingo yet, but teachers can make  more money by referring quilters to Inklingo for a shape collection than by selling other templates—without the risk of holding inventory that does not sell, or back-orders, or credit card processing fees, or breakage costs, or shipping time, or schlepping inventory on the road, etc. A dream come true.

The Affiliate Program is designed to be good for everyone—except maybe people who manufacture acrylic sheets or cut acrylic templates. LOL

WANT MORE?

There is more about using freezer paper in The Inklingo Handbook. One of our best Freezer Paper tips is in the first chapter—page H41 of the free Diamond-Triangle-Square shape collection.

There are two articles with tips for fussy cutting with FP templates too.

SUBSCRIBED?

I think you can tell how much I love freezer paper compared to other template materials! I did not intend this to be such a long post. I hope you find these tips useful.

Please subscribe (top of right sidebar), so you don’t miss what is coming next!

Thank you for visiting.

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  8 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

Inklingo on Facebook

You do NOT have to have a Facebook account to see what I post on the Inklingo Facebook page.
If you do have a FB account, please like my page and choose “Get Notifications” or Facebook will make me pay to show you what I post.
Facebook only shows my photos to about 16% of the quilters who have liked the page unless I agree to pay.

Thank you for subscribing to the blog!

Inklingo for Templates

When I wrote about fussy cutting hexagons for QuiltingHub recently, I realized that some quilters are not familiar with using Inklingo to make templates!

How ironic . . .

Quilted Diamonds

. . . especially considering that using templates was the technique I taught from 2000 to 2006 from my Quilted Diamonds books—and templates were the inspiration for Inklingo!

If I had not been teaching—and seeing first hand the problems quilters had with using templates—I would not have been inspired to find a faster, more accurate method of preparing shapes for hand and machine piecing.

Inklingo might not have been born!

 

Print shapes on fabric with Inklingo

My first choice is always to print the shapes on fabric with Inklingo. It is faster, easier and more accurate than using any kind of template.

Inklingo quilters spend more time sewing and less time getting ready to sew—and get better results!

WHY TEMPLATES?

There are some situations when templates make sense.

  • Fussy cutting when you don’t have enough fabric to print identical sheets for No Waste Fussy Cutting.
  • Using tiny scraps or pre-cut strips, too small even for the tips in the Top Ten Tutes.
  • Cutting huge shapes that are too big for your printer.
  • Using fabrics which are too dark on the wrong side to print easily even with the tips for dark fabric in Top Ten Tutes.

 

Inklingo shapes with and without seam allowances

I include the shapes WITHOUT seam allowances in Inklingo shape collections for situations like these.

 

Freezer paper for templates

WHY WE PREFER FREEZER PAPER FOR TEMPLATES

My favorite template material is freezer paper. It gives better results and it makes quilting accessible to more people.

All you need is a roll of freezer paper from the grocery store, a mechanical pencil, an acrylic ruler (any kind), and a small, flexible plastic ruler. The markings on the two rulers are not important because we only use them as a straight edge. No measuring, so nothing special to buy. Use what you already have.

1. Freezer paper is inexpensive and readily available—no waiting for delivery or paying for shipping.
Even if you do have to order FP online, you get a lot of FP for your shipping dollar, so you can always have it on hand.

Inklingo shapes with and without seam allowances

2. Freezer paper is easy to print with any ordinary Inkjet printer, so it works perfectly for  ANY shape you can print or draw and you can print as many as you need quickly. Freezer paper is versatile because it is easy to customize or cut partial shapes too.

3. Freezer paper templates are ideal for rotary cutting several layers at a time OR for scissors cutting, and there is no need to mark the cutting line on the fabric.

4. Freezer paper templates printed with Inklingo have matching marks on the seam lines, which is a big help when you are pinning and sewing.

Inklingo shapes with and without seam allowances

5. You can write on the FP to note which fabric to use, or the grain line, or number the pieces for sewing sequence or to avoid turning a piece the wrong way. Customize your templates in any way you like. A few notes are worthwhile especially because FP templates can be used over and over again.

6. Freezer paper templates are easy to store and re-use. They take up less room than acrylic or other templates and they are unbreakable!

Inklingo shapes with and without seam allowances

7. Freezer paper templates stay in position—no slipping and sliding—because we iron the plastic coated side to the wrong side of the fabric to create a temporary bond. If you don’t have an iron handy (preferred) you can tack freezer paper templates into position with a tiny dab of glue-stick instead of pins.

8. If you lose your freezer paper templates it is easy to make more instantly. No big investment, no frustration.

9. When you print freezer paper templates with Inklingo shape collections you also have instructions and yardage requirements. Some shape collections include bonus shapes too. These are not normally included with other kinds of templates.

Inklingo shapes with and without seam allowances

Freezer paper is less expensive than other template materials—but gives better results!

We love that!

THANK YOU, MARY!

I feel very lucky that my friend Mary taught me how to hand piece with freezer paper templates in the apartment by the beach in Naples in 1997. Without that, I might never have become a designer, an author, and an inventor.

Give a girl an acrylic template and she can make a quilt.
Teach a girl how to make freezer paper templates and she can make any quilt.

Freezer paper templates leave me with more money to buy fabric too. Mary was the first person I ever met who had a “stash.” LOL She has had a big influence on my life.

NEXT TIME—TEMPLATE TIPS

My Best Tip—Print the shapes on fabric with Inklingo whenever you can!

However, next time I will share my best tips for using templates, including tips for:

  • using and re-using freezer paper
  • taking the curl out
  • marking tools
  • marking accurately
  • rotary cutting without waste
  • storing your templates
  • and more!

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Thank you for visiting here and on FB! See you next time.

Linda & Monkey

New to Inklingo? Order and download free shapes and start sewing in the next few minutes. Quick Start (Always FREE.) There are triangles, diamonds, and squares in the free collection—great for dozens of different blocks.

$10 Coupon!  8 Year Anniversary Special on the handbook

Inklingo for Beginners

25 Signs YOU are an Inklingo Quilter

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